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Archaeology in Review

Israeli Researchers Discover New Bee Species

There is no overestimating the importance of pollinators in our world today. While crop pollination relies mainly on managed colonies of the domesticated honey bee (Apis mellifera), wild, unmanaged pollinators were found to be highly effective, often critical contributors to pollination services in natural and agricultural systems. Among these wild pollinators, native bees are the most

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Trove of Ancient Coins Discovered

A rare coin hoard from the Abbasid period, dating around 1,100 years ago, was uncovered by a group of youths volunteering before their army service in an archaeological excavation carried out by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA). According to the directors of the excavation, Liat Nadav-Ziv and Dr. Elie Haddad of the IAA: “The hoard,

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Ancient Two-Shekalim Weight Discovered Adjacent to the Western Wall

An ancient limestone-made weight, dating to the Iron Age—the First Temple period—was discovered in an archaeological excavation conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) in conjunction with the Western Wall Heritage Foundation. The excavation site is beneath Wilson’s Arch, adjacent to the Western Wall of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The weight, corresponding to the

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Israeli Company Swaps Injectable for Oral Insulin

Wednesday, 2 December 2020 | After 14 years of painstaking research, an Israeli company is ready to cross the finish line with a product that promises to revolutionize the treatment of diabetes. Oramed Pharmaceuticals recently started final-stage tests of its oral insulin under the US Food and Drug Administration, a product that may well see

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Israeli Schoolboy Discovers Ancient Burial Slab

Monday, 27 January 2020 | Stav Meir, 13, who attended archeology classes in his school with the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), immediately realized he had stumbled upon an ancient find and reported it. He was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation for good citizenship and the class will soon enjoy a special activity. Stav, a 13-year-old

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Colorful Mosaics Revealed at Hippos

A well-preserved mosaic laden with decorations, including dedication inscriptions and descriptions of baskets with loaves and fish, was exposed in an excavation at the “Burnt Church” in Hippos overlooking the Kinneret (Sea of Galilee). Hippos was the central city in the region around the eastern Sea of Galilee and the southern Golan during Roman and

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Family Finds 1,400-Year-Old Hammer and Nails

Friday, 1 November 2019 | A family participating in an Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) excavation some 9.3 miles [15 km] east of Haifa at the ancient city of Usha found a 1,400-year-old hammer and nails. This was particularly interesting because it confirmed the fact that the ancient inhabitants of Usha manufactured iron tools. The IAA’s

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Ancient City Discovered in Israel: “Early Bronze Age New York of Our Region”

Monday, 7 October 2019 | A 5,000-year-old city—considered massive for its timeframe—has been discovered as part of a road construction project in north-central Israel. The city, which could have accommodated around 6,000 inhabitants and was more than 0.25 square miles (0.64 square kilometers) in size, displays ancient city planning, societal hierarchy and more. “This is

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A Road Well Traveled: The Pilgrimage Road to the Temple Mount

“That is where the tribes go up—the tribes of the LORD—to praise the name of the LORD according to the statute given to Israel.” (Psalm 122:4 NIV) It was described as the beating heart of Jerusalem—a place of bustling commerce, braying donkeys, chattering children playing hide-and-seek among the robe-clad legs of pilgrims; a politician bellowing

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Jewish Settlement from the Second Temple Period Uncovered in Beersheva

For the first time, the remains of a Jewish settlement of the Second Temple period have been discovered in Beersheva, revealing evidence of Jewish day-to-day life there. The site, dated from the first century AD until the Bar Kokhba Revolt in AD 135, appears to contain underground hidden passageways used by the Jewish rebels. According

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