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Archaeology in Review

Monastery Discovery

January 8, 2006

The skeletal remains of seven horses have been uncovered under the 17th century Armenian Monastery in Jaffa, which archaeologists believe is evidence of the battles that were fought along the walls of the ancient port city in earlier periods, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced in November.

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Oldest Christian Church Discovered in Megiddo Prison

January 8, 2006

Ramillo Razilo was serving a two-year sentence in the Megiddo prison for traffic offenses. His work duty was to remove rubble from the planned site of a new prison cellblock. When his shovel struck a hard surface, he became the man who discovered the oldest church found in Israel to date. “We continued to look; and slowly, we found this whole beautiful thing,” Razilo said. He was referring to a mosaic floor, uncovered by using a sponge and buckets of water.

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Treasure found in Temple Mount Rubble

When Dr. Gabriel Barkay, archaeology professor at Bar-Ilan University, led his team into a Kidron Valley garbage dump, he was inspired by Psalm 102:14, “For Your servants take pleasure in her stones, and show favor to her dust.”

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New Leviticus Scroll Unearthed Near Ein Gedi

September 20, 2005

A recent discovery—the first since 1965 at Masada and currently being authenticated by the Israel Antiquities Authorities (IAA)—is believed to be part of the 15th scroll of Leviticus. This gives hope that there is “still a chance” to find documents in the Judean Desert, said Professor Hanan Eshel of Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan.

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Palace of King David discovered

September 20, 2005

The Bible has led the way to a new and exciting archaeological discovery in Jerusalem. Famed Israeli archaeologist Dr. Eilat Mazar of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem followed Bible verses to what is believed to be the palace of King David.

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Arabs Vandalize Judaism´s Holiest Site

August 8, 2005

An act of Islamic vandalism on a wall of Judaism’s holiest site, the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, has elicited outrage on the part of archaeologists. In March, the word “Allah” was found carved into the eastern wall of the Temple Mount. The Arabic letters are approximately a foot tall (30.5 centimeters).

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Thieves Try to Sell Ancient Bones

August 8, 2005

First, the antiquities thieves sold stolen ancient burial boxes. Now, they are trying to sell the human bones inside them as well. Israel’s Antiquities Authority announced that they had thwarted an attempt by two Jerusalem Arab men to sell four Second-Temple ossuaries—and the human bones inside—to Zaka, Israel’s volunteer rescue and recovery organization, for reburial.

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Israeli Authorities Prevent Smuggling

August 8, 2005

An antiquities expert attempting to sneak an ancient measuring weight out of Israel was thwarted by a joint Postal Authority, Antiquities Authority, and Customs Bureau effort.

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Arabs Vandalize Judaism´s Holiest Site

July 5, 2005

An act of Islamic vandalism on a wall of Judaism’s holiest site, the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, has elicited outrage on the part of archaeologists. In March, the word “Allah” was found carved into the eastern wall of the Temple Mount. The Arabic letters are approximately a foot tall (30.5 centimeters).

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Thieves Try to Sell Ancient Bones

July 5, 2005

First, the antiquities thieves sold stolen ancient burial boxes. Now, they are trying to sell the human bones inside them as well.

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